Queries

The Queries window shows information about the queries executed by all sessions. 

Slow queries (per second)

Number of queries that have taken more than slow_launch_time to create.

Sorts (per second)

Merge passes The number of merge passes the sort algorithm has had to do. If this value is large, you should consider increasing the value of the sort_buffer_size system variable.
With ranges The number of sorts that were done with ranges.
Table scan The number of sorts that were done by scanning the table.

Sorted rows (per second)

Number of sorted rows per second

Joins (per second)

Full join The number of joins that do not use indexes. If this value is not 0, you should carefully check the indexes of your tables.
Full range join The number of joins that used a range search on a reference table.
Select range The number of joins that used ranges on the first table. (It's normally not critical even if this is big.)
Select range check The number of joins without keys that check for key usage after each row. (If this is not 0, you should carefully check the indexes of your tables.)
Select scan The number of joins that did a full scan of the first table.

Rows  (per second)

Deleted The number of times a row was deleted from a table.
Inserted The number of requests to insert a row in a table.
Updated The number of requests to update a row in a table.

Reads a row (per second)

First from index The number of times the first entry was read from an index. If this is high, it suggests that the server is doing a lot of full index scans; for example, SELECT col1 FROM foo, assuming that col1 is indexed.
Based on a key The number of requests to read a row based on a key. If this is high, it is a good indication that your queries and tables are properly indexed
Next in key order The number of requests to read the next row in key order. This will be incremented if you are querying an index column with a range constraint or if you are doing an index scan.
Prev in key order The number of requests to read the previous row in key order. This read method is mainly used to optimize ORDER BY ... DESC.
Based on fixed pos The number of requests to read a row based on a fixed position. This will be high if you are doing a lot of queries that require sorting of the result. You probably have a lot of queries that require MySQL to scan whole tables or you have joins that don't use keys properly.
Next in datafile The number of requests to read the next row in the data file. This will be high if you are doing a lot of table scans. Generally this suggests that your tables are not properly indexed or that your queries are not written to take advantage of the indexes you have.

Internal requests (per second)

Commit The number of internal COMMIT statements
Rollback The number of internal ROLLBACK statements

Temporary tables (per second)

Disk The number of temporary tables on disk created automatically by the server while executing statements
Memory The number of in-memory temporary tables created automatically by the server while executing statements. If the number of temporary tables on disk created is big, you may want to increase the tmp_table_size value to cause temporary tables to be memory-based instead of disk-based

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